Calling All Anglers!

Now it’s even easier to stay up to date on the latest science and news. Just check back here for new posts every Monday.

And… calling all scientists! If you’d like to write for Hook, Line & Science about your research, please contact Scott Baker at msbaker@ncsu.edu or Sara Mirabilio at semirabi@ncsu.edu.

Can Insight from Ancient Oysters Provide Solutions for Modern Oyster Management?

April 27, 2020 | Dave Shaw

The fossil record may suggest keys to protecting the modern-day species.

What Attracts Blacktip Sharks to Fishing Piers?

April 20, 2020 | Dave Shaw

Research shows the number of anglers makes a difference.

What’s Up With NC Shrimp?

April 13, 2020 | Dave Shaw

Are we catching more shrimp offshore during the winter and spring?

People measure an amberjack

Discarding Greater Amberjack: Catch and Release or Catch and Decease?

April 6, 2020 | Dave Shaw

Electronic tagging shows that most of these fish survive the catch-and-release experience.

What Will Historic Dock Photos Reveal about Fisheries?

March 30, 2020 | Dave Shaw

Citizen scientists will help to fill in the gaps.

What Affects the Size of Juvenile Southern Flounder?

March 23, 2020 | Dave Shaw

Recent findings highlight how differences in salinity and diet impact growth.

Does Hand-Crank Electrofishing Help Battle Invasive Catfish?

March 16, 2020 | Dave Shaw

Hand-crank electrofishing — or “telephoning” — is a recreational fishing technique that has been legal in North Carolina since 1985. As the name suggests, it involves using a telephone generator to produce low-voltage alternating current by turning a hand crank, which stuns catfish.

What Keeps Striped Bass Populations from Rebounding?

March 9, 2020 | Dave Shaw

New modelling suggests why the species hasn’t recovered in the Neuse River.

Do Anglers Want Creature Comforts at Access Sites?

March 2, 2020 | Dave Shaw

The answer changes according to their age, gender, and other demographics.

Do Gray Triggerfish Survive After Catch-and-Release?

February 24, 2020 | Dave Shaw

New science shows they usually don’t.