What Will Historic Dock Photos Reveal about Fisheries?

March 30, 2020 | Dave Shaw

Citizen scientists will help to fill in the gaps. FISHstory (rhymes with “history”), the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council’s citizen science project, will take participants back in time to the docks of Daytona Beach. The…

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What Affects the Size of Juvenile Southern Flounder?

March 23, 2020 | Dave Shaw

Recent findings highlight how differences in salinity and diet impact growth.

Does Hand-Crank Electrofishing Help Battle Invasive Catfish?

March 16, 2020 | Dave Shaw

Hand-crank electrofishing — or “telephoning” — is a recreational fishing technique that has been legal in North Carolina since 1985. As the name suggests, it involves using a telephone generator to produce low-voltage alternating current by turning a hand crank, which stuns catfish.

What Keeps Striped Bass Populations from Rebounding?

March 9, 2020 | Dave Shaw

New modelling suggests why the species hasn’t recovered in the Neuse River.

Do Anglers Want Creature Comforts at Access Sites?

March 2, 2020 | Dave Shaw

The answer changes according to their age, gender, and other demographics.

Do Gray Triggerfish Survive After Catch-and-Release?

February 24, 2020 | Dave Shaw

New science shows they usually don’t.

Are the Number of Adults with a Shellfish Allergy Increasing?

February 17, 2020 | Dave Shaw

Research shows that nearly 3% of adults in our country are allergic to shellfish.

What Is the Status of the World’s Managed Fisheries?

February 10, 2020 | Dave Shaw

On average, fish stocks are increasing in places where they’re managed — and they’re in much worse shape in locations where they aren’t managed.

How Important Is It to Limit Reef Fishing Locations and Seasons?

February 3, 2020 | Dave Shaw

New science shows conservation strategies have worked to rebuild the Nassau grouper population.

Is Climate Change Affecting Sea Turtle Hatchlings?

January 27, 2020 | Dave Shaw

Researchers at UNCW show warming temperatures cause loggerheads to give birth mostly to female offspring. Read more in Hook, Line & Science.